Heald and Bradley Ponds Reserve (Lovell, ME)

The Heald and Bradley Ponds Reserve consists of over 800 acres in Lovell, Maine, preserved and maintained for public use by the Greater Lovell Land Trust (GLLT) –  see GLLT map here.  A detailed description of trails is also available in the AMC Maine Mountain Guide.  While snowmobiles are allowed in winter on marked trails, I didn’t see any on the sunny February Sunday I visited.  I followed an easy to moderate (double, triple?) lollipop loop for about 4.6 miles (appx 2 hours, 886 feet of elevation gain), summiting Amos Mountain (955 ft) and Whiting Hill (801 ft) via the Blue, Orange, Yellow and Red trails.

Icy mill dam outlet of Heald Pond, Lovell, ME
Icy mill dam outlet of Heald Pond, Lovell, ME

From the (well-plowed) parking lot on Slab City Road, it is a short downhill walk to the Blue Trail, past the southern outlet of Heald Pond.  Informational kiosks are at the parking area and at the beginning of the Blue Trail, additionally, small placards at trail intersections, each with a laminated trail map, make navigation self-correcting (“You Are Here” is difficult to screw up).

I wore snowshoes the entire route, and once off the snowmobile trail, was breaking trail through the deep, crusty snow.  While the snowshoes made for enhanced mobility, the rasp and stomp of my steps eliminated my chances of seeing much wildlife.  I was lucky enough to see a large pileated woodpecker, and the signs in the snow of others – the soft tread of foxes, the larger, circling tread of coyotes, the bouncing tread of deer, and the deeper, larger crescents left by moose.

Mt Washington wreathed in clouds from Amos Mountain viewpoint, Lovell, ME
Mt Washington wreathed in clouds from Amos Mountain viewpoint, Lovell, ME

I bypassed Whiting Hill on the way out, sticking to the west shore of Heald Pond on the Red Dot Trail, and clambering down the Otter Rocks Spur briefly to look at the frozen lake, and the sole visible ice fishing shack.  As I was solo, wearing snowshoes, and shoreline ice is often the most treacherous, I didn’t venture out on the frozen pond.  Continuing gradually uphill, I reached the intersection with the Chestnut Trail (blue blazes), and turned left, towards the Heritage Loop Trail (orange blazes), and a broad circle of the summit of Amos Mountain.

Summit cairns and bench, Amos Mountain, Lovell, ME
Summit cairns and bench, Amos Mountain, Lovell, ME

To the west of the summit is a viewpoint, just short of the Rogers Family Trail (blue blazes), with views of the Whites, with Mt. Washington as a centerpiece.  The wooded summit of Amos Mountain contains rock cairns and a bench, with views to the southwest.

Kezar Lake and the Whites from Whiting Hill summit, Lovell, ME
Kezar Lake and the Whites from Whiting Hill summit, Lovell, ME

I descended Amos Mountain to the Hemlock Loop Trail, and a small picnic area, then headed towards Whiting Hill and its loop back to the start of the trail and the parking area.  Whiting Hall has a more open summit, with views to the West of Kezar Lake and the White Mountains beyond, and an easy downhill walk ended at Slab City Road.

This would also be a beautiful fall hike, but I enjoyed having the place mostly to myself in the snow.  Parking areas on Route 5 and Heald Pond Road can also be used to shorten the hike for children or the less mobile – see the GLLT map for locations.  This Reserve is not far from Sabattus Mountain, and the post-hike stops available in Lovell are the same – the Center Lovell Market, for picnic supplies and a restaurant, and (after checking seasonal hours) Ebenezer’s Pub for food and Belgian beer.

Sabattus Mountain (Lovell, ME)

Sabattus Mountain (1,253 ft) in Lovell, Maine is an easy, family-friendly hike with sweeping views of the Lakes Region and White Mountains.  Dad and Mom completed the 1.6 mile loop in about forty-five minutes at a relaxed pace, and Daughter went on ahead and finished in about half an hour.  You can find a detailed description of this hike in the AMC Maine Mountain Guide, or the AllTrails app (download the map beforehand – not much cell service near the mountain).

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Can you tell birches apart?  The Sabattus Mountain markers also help with ferns, mosses, and other trees.

 

The sign at the trailhead, located off Sabattus Mountain Road, credits cooperative efforts between the Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands and the Greater Lovell Land Trust (GLLT) with making possible public access to the area.  A look at GLLT’s web site shows they have many educational activities to offer, and multiple other trails.  The Sabattus Mountain loop trail, which passes through a variety of terrain, includes helpful markers identifying the flora (nice post here on their installation).  We headed left at the loop to go up, and this seems like an easier ascent than the right/westerly path, which could be slick in rainy weather.

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The views from the summit were as advertised on this clear day at the end of June, and there are even a couple park benches from which to relax and enjoy the scenery.  Use caution with small children and dogs, as the cliffs drop off steeply.  An observation tower at the loop junction is no longer there – just the base exists now.

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Park bench on the summit

After a stop at the summit, we completed the loop, returning to the trailhead.  A great stop before or after this hike is the Center Lovell Market, which has everything you would want for a picnic, as well as a restaurant.  Sabattus Mountain is not that far from beautiful Pietree Orchard in Sweden, which has a farmstand, pick-your-own fruit options, and pizza.  And, as mentioned before on this blog, Ebenezer’s Pub in Lovell is the perfect place to enjoy a Belgian beer.