Quoddy Head State Park (Lubec, ME)

The word “Easternmost” is prominently advertised in many places across Lubec, including Quoddy Head State Park, which comprises 541 acres at the tip of the U.S.’s eastern reach.  By the time you reach Quoddy Head State Park, off South Lubec Road, you will likely have seen many advertisements for all things “easternmost” (campgrounds, gift shops, etc).  But beyond the quick tour stop and lighthouse “selfies,” this park offers an array of trails for all abilities with impressive ocean views and a variety of coastal vegetation.  The best guide to the park’s trails is the map provided by the state of Maine: Quoddy Head State Park Guide & Map.

We started with the Coast Guard Trail, a 1-mile trail north of the entrance, which includes an overlook of the Lubec Channel, as well as a view of the town of Lubec back to the west, after a short climb up a wooden staircase.  According to the Quoddy Head Guide, the first .5 miles of the western part of this trail is accessible by motorized wheelchair. After the lookout, the Coast Guard Trail then descends through the thick coastal woods to the lighthouse, passing several viewpoints along the volcanic rocks.  The path was full of birds and squirrels gathering food on this warm, sunny October day.

West Quoddy Head Lighthouse, Lubec, ME
West Quoddy Head Lighthouse, Lubec, ME

The small lighthouse museum (free, but donations always help) includes displays featuring the history of the lighthouse, flora and fauna of the area, and a guide to whales, commonly sighted off the coast.  The area around the lighthouse contains a large number of picnic tables with excellent views, and the only restrooms in the park (easternmost privies in the U.S.?  Probably).  From the lighthouse area and most of the coastal trails, the cliffs of the Canadian island of Grand Manan are visible across the Quoddy Channel.

The terrain was impressive, and those with small children need to keep them close, as there are plenty of dizzying cliffs on the U.S. side, as well.  The beaches are rocky, but make a far more interesting sound than sand beaches, combining the tidal roar with a rattling, suction sound as the rocks move together when the waves recede.

Coastal Trail at Quoddy Head State Park, Lubec, ME
Coastal Trail at Quoddy Head State Park, Lubec, ME.

The Coastal Trail travels west along the shore past incredible views and scenic points like Gulliver’s Hole, High Ledge, and Green Point, with frequent stops in between to take in the powerful ocean.  We did not linger at Green Point, a ledge with paths down to a beach, as we may have interrupted two hikers in some sort of extracurricular activity there (The trails became more and more empty the farther we got from the lighthouse).

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At Carrying Place Cove, Thompson Trail heads back east, inland towards the parking area, with the short .2 mile spur of Bog Trail along the way.  This side of the trail, in particular the sand beach at Carrying Place Cove, is also accessible from South Lubec Road.  The Bog Trail includes a boardwalk and interpretive signs explaining the coastal plateau bog, also called a heath, according to the Quoddy Head Guide.

Thompson Trail is, for the most part, an easier walk than the coastal trail, with a few brief climbs.  The best feature of this trail was the scent of pine, which created a perfumed evergreen tunnel in the narrower sections, redolent with notes of citrus and vanilla.

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We completed most of the trails in the park, and stopped plenty of times to relax and take photos, making this about a three-hour visit.  The difficulty level is described in the park guide as moderate, which seems about right. There are no strenuous climbs, but consistent steps over rocks and roots could make this more difficult for some hikers. There weren’t any bugs during this Columbus Day weekend, but the boggy areas guarantee mosquitoes and black flies in late spring and summer, and repellent would be a must.  I would also suggest waterproof shoes, or at least wearing something on your feet that you don’t mind getting wet or muddy.  Depending on your roaming plan, you may want to put your phone in airplane mode, as it will likely be using Canadian towers along this shore.

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Lubec fishing fleet at dusk

Lubec, across a narrow channel from Canada’s Campobello Island, is the closest town nearby, but Machias is not that far away, and many smaller towns in Downeast Maine and the Cobscook Bay region are worth a visit.  After the hike, if you can catch them open during fall hours, try the craft beer and pizza at Lubec Brewing Company or upscale pub cuisine at Cohill’s Inn on Water Street in Lubec.  If you are headed south, go to Skywalker’s Bar and Grille in Machias (try the fish tacos) for a great menu and Machias River Brewing Company beers.

Quoddy Head, though remote, is hardly a secret anymore- we joked that AirBnB renters and vacationers from New York outnumbered locals in Lubec. But steps beyond the famous lighthouse is a surprisingly wild Maine coast to explore.

5 thoughts on “Quoddy Head State Park (Lubec, ME)

  1. mary October 13, 2018 / 8:50 am

    Sounds lovely. Trying to plan spending a few days there next year. As you mentioned, out of state visitors surely know this place, as all the “airbnb” rentals are already booked for July and August. Will try June and deal with the bugs. Thanks for the info

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  2. Mike Hohmann October 13, 2018 / 9:02 pm

    Looks like a nice place to visit, but a long way from MN. We may get out to VT next summer, but Lubec is still a long way! If we get to Bar Harbor, we’d be in striking distance and likely make it all the way. My wife really enjoyed Bar Harbor a few years ago! 😉

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  3. Your Travel Cap October 13, 2018 / 10:25 pm

    This looks like a cool place to visit. Thanks for sharing. As it’s not far from me (in MA), I think I’ll add this to my bucket list.

    Like

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