Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge (Wells, ME)

Salt marsh view on the Carson Trail, Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, in Wells, ME.
Salt marsh view on the Carson Trail, Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, in Wells, ME.

Established in 1966, Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge is located along fifty miles of southern Maine coastline and divided into eleven sections between Kittery and Cape Elizabeth. In the Wells section, the Carson Trail is a short, easy, beautiful stroll that is flat, wide enough for two people side-by-side, and well-suited for those who don’t want elevation or rocky paths. This one-mile loop showcases coastal wetlands, consisting of salt marsh and deciduous and pine forests. Since I was already in the area, it seemed like a perfectly laid-back 45-minute activity.

The wide, flat, well-marked Carson Trail, Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, in Wells, ME.
The wide, flat, well-marked Carson Trail, Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, in Wells, ME.

The refuge, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, has its entrance at 321 Port Road in Wells, Maine, with parking, restrooms, picnic tables, signage and maps, and is open from sunrise to sunset. I would recommend getting the trail guide (found in a box at the trailhead) not because there is any danger of getting lost (near impossible) but  because it details 11 stopping points along the trail. It explains various elements like “critical edge,” the difference between salt hay and smooth cordgrass, and a brief history of Rachel Carson. (If you can keep your map in good condition, please return it to the box at the end). The trail was relatively quiet, which was surprising for this beautiful Saturday afternoon.

Trail kiosk with guide/map, Carson Trail, Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, in Wells, ME.
Trail kiosk with guide/map, Carson Trail, Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, in Wells, ME.

The trail follows Merriland River (on your right) and then halfway through (viewpoint #6), you will see the intersection of Merriland River and Branch Brook as it forms Little River. At several of the lookout points, you can see the ocean crashing in the distance or sit on a bench and watch a white heron in the tall grass. Everything is well-maintained and safe. I would highly recommend this walk for small children, who can look for birds, watch as the tide comes in or goes out or run ahead of the adults to get to the next trail marker. Leashed pets are allowed (on the Carson Trail only).  I would emphasize staying on the trail for obvious reasons but especially because I noticed poison ivy on the trail edge.

Salt marsh view, Carson Trail, Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, in Wells, ME.
Salt marsh view, Carson Trail, Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, in Wells, ME.

As a bonus – it is only a five-minute drive from the Wells Reserve at Laudholm, which has 7 miles of trails, and so you could make your way over there with a picnic lunch and enjoy the rest of the afternoon.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s