Mowry Beach (Lubec, ME)

Mowry Beach Trail from the Pleasant Street trailhead
Mowry Beach Trail from the Pleasant Street trailhead.

A short distance from downtown Lubec, the easternmost town in the U.S., Mowry Beach is a quiet 48-acre conservation area overlooking Deep Cove, Lubec Channel and Canada’s Campobello Island.  This area, managed by the Downeast Coastal Conservancy (DCC), offers a .4 mile trail from Lubec’s Consolidated School on South Street to a parking area at the end of Pleasant Street, including a 1,700 foot boardwalk.  The DCC publishes a map and brochure, available on their website.

View of downtown Lubec and the international bridge to Campobello from Mowry Beach
View of Lubec village and the international bridge to Campobello from Mowry Beach.

We learned of this beach through a great Cobscook Trails Map and Guide published by Cobscook Trails, with hikes throughout the Cobscook Bay region, a free and widely available (at local businesses) pamphlet which I would recommend for anyone exploring the area.  At the Pleasant Street end of the trail, which we accessed via a short walk from downtown, is 1,800 feet of shorefront along a sand beach.  According to guides, ancient tree stumps can be seen along the lower portions of the beach at low tide, a forest that was present during an era with lower water levels.

On the October day we visited, seals were active, using the rapidly outgoing tide to move swiftly east at waterskiing speeds in the Lubec Channel in search of food.  For sea-glass collectors, this working waterfront has a variety of shiny objects along the shore.  During our walk, we also encountered two people helpfully picking up any garbage left on the beach.

Boardwalk on Mowry Beach Trail
Boardwalk on Mowry Beach Trail.

We turned into the trail, passing bright beach rose bushes. The trail and boardwalk are alive with birds, and we startled a large bird of prey that had been resting in a tree next to the boardwalk, which took off almost straight up, like a rocket (which, in turn, startled us).  DCC’s guide lists rough-legged hawks, northern harriers, and northern shrikes as frequent visitors to the conservation area.

Mowry Beach conservation area from the playground of Lubec Consolidated School
Mowry Beach conservation area from the playground of Lubec Consolidated School.

We continued through the coastal bog and an area lined with cattails and small trees, emerging behind the Lubec Consolidated School.  For those with mobility issues, intimidated by longer hikes, or entertaining smaller children, this relatively short walk on wide paths and boardwalk is a great side excursion from the village of Lubec.